Do You Love What You Do?

NOTE:

The below essay was written for those individuals who were fortunate enough to identify their passion. Alas, the vast majority are devoid of this luxury. Therefore, if you know what you love to do, then be appreciative and demonstrate your gratitude by pursuing your passion against all odds, i.e., don’t make excuses for being a coward when you’ve been blessed with a passion that so many others…wished they could have.

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Unfortunately, very few people throughout the world actually love what they do for a living. As a corollary, the global culture has gradually decayed over the passage of time, succumbing itself to philistine conduct. But what is most alarming is the fact that middle class society has settled for less. Instead of pursuing a field of study that truly invigorates them, they compromise their true potential for material comforts. They allow their fears and insecurities to undermine their soulful aspirations; and thereby, choosing a road of practicality over passion and zeal — or a sense of adventure, which leads inevitably to a humdrum life.

In my estimation, only the poor and less fortunate have legitimate reasons for being disgruntled since the root of their schooling was more or less deficient — the ramifications of a broken infrastructure, courtesy of our blatant apathy. On the other hand, the bourgeoisie have no excuses as they were afforded the opportunities to excel and flourish at something they loved. And yet, despite the academic tools available to them, e.g., the university, they still opted for a safe and lifeless career, thwarting any hopes of real ingenuity with regard to their discipline.

And how about you? Are you actually doing what you truly love, or did you settle for mediocrity? Are you merely a drone, a blind conformist who sheepishly kowtows to the social mores at the expense of forgoing your dream? It may sound harsh, but I’m earnestly trying to help — by stating the truth of your circumstance. If you’re like the majority, your job provides you with a comfortable life, which is tolerable to a certain extent. Yet nonetheless, why not enjoy material comforts by way of doing what it is you love? Obviously, you’ll have to earn it rather painfully, which is the physical law of the universe. You’ll have to sacrifice and toil; exercise the virtue of patience. It will definitely hurt, but isn’t it worth it? That’s a deeply profound question to consider and ruminate.

Additionally, please bear in mind of the vast distinction between LOVING your job and merely being COMFORTABLE. As a matter of fact, you must approach your career as if it were a marriage, a personal relationship that you dearly treasure. Just ponder the notion for a thoughtful moment. If you’re a person with depth and real intelligence, you will aspire to be with someone who deeply exhilarates you, challenges you to stomp outside your comfort zone and strive for your highest capacity…no matter the odds. Your J-O-B should demand the same of you. But conversely, if you’re an individual who is utterly shallow and afraid of life, more often than not, you’ll be merely content with a pedestrian marriage where indifference and boredom mires your life. Your J-O-B should not encourage such trite behavior, yet it does for many.

Making excuses and being cynical is always convenient. It’s an easy cop-out. But the path of love is for the bold and fearless. Put bluntly, “love ain’t for cowards.” Love, rather, is for the enlightened mind. It elicits change. It elevates our game. And it breeds originality. Our anemic culture desperately needs that; therefore, we must ardently strive to do what we love, even more so, in the face of adversity. Though we cannot save the world, we can still do our part with a spoonful of character and a dash of integrity.

 

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© Moky Kinh-Quoc Huynh and MokyTiger1, Year 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Moky Kinh-Quoc Huynh and MokyTiger1 with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.